Industry News

New York Times, February 2017

A rapidly advancing crack in Antarctica’s fourth-largest ice shelf has scientists concerned that it is getting close to a full break.” 

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Rising Seas [Documentary], January 2017

When the king tides arrive in the spring and fall, South Florida is forced to acknowledge that the seas are rising. The question is, “What can be done?” 

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Yale Climate Connections, January 2017

“The Bizzare Case of the Octopus in the Parking Garage: A scientist says the unexpected visitor is a sign of rising seas in Miami."

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New York Times, January 2017

“Rising sea levels and a changing climate present a challenge for our country’s largest city, and also an opportunity to create a more resilient, sustainable and equitable New York City."

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Coastal News Today, January 2017

"Coastal flooding may force thousands of homes in Louisiana to be elevated or bought out."

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Capital Gazette, January 2017

"Annapolis averages about 39 nuisance floods a year, according to a 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration report. That's the most such floods in the country. The floods lead to everything from road closures to wet socks."

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staugustine, December 2016

"While sea level rise is a different issue than hurricane flooding, Officials in St. Augustine are already looking at possible effects of sea level rise."

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Fort Lauderdale Daily, December 2016

"The Future of Fort Lauderdale: Here's what our city might look like in 2050."

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Miami Herald, December 2016

"Florida scientists call for climate meeting with Trump."

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Crain's New York Business, December 2016

"When the president-elect's Palm Beach club is under water, a $25 billion barrier on dry land would mock his memory."

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Time, December 2016

"Florida’s coasts are ground zero for flooding from rising seas. Sea level rise is a well-documented phenomenon, affecting the entire state of Florida from the Keys up through St. Augustine."

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Miami New Times, December 2016

"According to a report on global warming, Miami's causeways — the Tuttle and Rickenbacker specifically — are some of the most vulnerable roads in the county."

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Times Ledger, December 2016

"Parts of New York City, including significant sections of the Rockaways and other parts of southern Queens, could potentially be inundated by a possible sea level rise projected for the coming century."

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Yale Climate Connections, December 2016

"Rolling Stone Senior writer Jeff Goodell has been following the story of sea-level rise around the world for several years. Independent videographer Peter Sinclair followed Jeff on a tour of America's most vulnerable metropolis."

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Florida Realtors, November 2016

"Rising sea levels are changing the way people think about waterfront real estate. Though demand remains strong and developers continue to build near the water in many coastal cities, homeowners across the nation are slowly growing wary of buying property in areas most vulnerable to the effects of climate change."

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Miami Herald, November 2016

"This is our today, our everyday reality, our future. The question is whether we fight it — and how — or whether we ignore it. For most of us, denial is not an option. Local governments are on board. How could they not be?"

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Sun Sentinel, November 2016

"Residents and officials say the flooding has been getting worse the past few years, with scientists and experts pointing to climate change and sea level rise as a contributing factor. They also highlight the need for updated infrastructure, like higher sea walls and drainage systems that are better able to keep the water off the streets."

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Miami Herald, November 2016

"The canary in the coal mine once served as a natural warning system in a bygone industrial era. Now, for Florida at least, maybe it ought to be the octopus in the parking garage."

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Boston Globe, November 2016

"Did the king tides give us a glimpse into the future? Experts warn that eventually sea levels will have risen to the point where such flooding will be routine."

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New York Times, November 2016

"In South Florida, which takes rising sea levels seriously enough to form a regional compact to deal with global warming, climate change is no abstract issue. By 2100, sea levels could swell high enough to submerge 12.5 percent of Florida’s homes."

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Miami Herald, November 2016

"While city leaders have touted the dry street during king tides during the past two years, showing off dry streets on days where coastal flooding inundated other parts of South Florida, they may not have realized the unintended consequence of raising the road."

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The Weather Channel, November 2016

"The king tide occurs when the earth, moon, and sun align. Gravity pulls the oceans to their highest tides, often 'afflicting coastal communities with minor or nuisance flooding that can close roads, inundate local businesses, erode beaches and cause sewage overflows,' according to a report by Climate Central."

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Today, November 2016

"Even without clouds in the sky, parts of Florida’s coast are flooding. Experts say extra water in the ocean from melting ice caps are causing high tides to creep even higher on land. NBC’s Kerry Sanders reports for Sunday TODAY on the stressful 'sunny day flooding' that has some residents worried, and how cities are handling them."

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Herald Tribune, November 2016

"The planet’s ice has melted before — even the skeptics will stipulate to that — and it will do so again, scientists say. The atmosphere will get warmer, which may or may not be caused by the burning of fossil fuels by humans. So, the questions become, when will the sea rise, by how much, and what will it mean for a Florida economy that is built around the waterfront dream? And, most importantly, what should we do about it?"


Yahoo! News, November 2016

"The study, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that if global warming pushes past 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels, about 80 percent of the global coastline may see more sea level rise than the global average."

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Yale Climate Connections, November 2016

"Since Florida does not collect income tax, it relies heavily on sales and property taxes. Jacobs worries that as flooding increases — and tourists seek higher ground — Florida will lose the revenue it needs to provide essential services. There are no two sources of taxes that are more vulnerable to sea level rise than property taxes and sales tax."

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Fayetteville Observer, November 2016

"Extreme flooding in the Southeast has displaced thousands of families and may even suppress voter turnout in North Carolina — a key swing state. Yet, the impacts of climate change have been largely absent from the political news cycle. Americans should demand solutions to the greatest challenges facing our nation, and the hurricane should be a wakeup call for elected leaders who think they can put off preparing for climate change."

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The Coastal Star, November 2016

"South Florida got two worrisome weather alarms in October: a warning in advance of Hurricane Matthew and, two weeks later, a National Weather Service coastal flood advisory for king tides. Coastal residents usually don’t pay as much attention to king tides as they do to dramatic TV graphics tracking hurricanes across the Atlantic, although high tides can cause tremendous damage on the coast. But king tides are starting to get their due."

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New Security Beat, November 2016

"There may not have been a single question about climate change in the 2016 presidential debates, but it remains a hotly contested, partisan issue for many in the United States. That climate change is happening and requires a response is not up for debate within the upper echelons of the U.S. military, however."

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New York Times, October 2016

"Accuracy is everything, often the difference between life and death, given that extreme weather — tornadoes, flash floods, heat waves — kills more than 500 Americans each year. Industries like shipping, energy, agriculture and utilities lose money when predictions fail. Even slightly more precise wind-speed projections would help airlines greatly reduce fuel costs."

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WUSF News, October 2016

"Realtor Julie Jones says it’s one of the first things her buyers ask now: does the property flood during the king tides? The days of just smiling sweetly and saying, 'Oh no, it’s not a problem,' are clearly gone as you’re going to see this morning, she said. [Real estate lawyer Ben] Olive says there’s no legal precedent that says a seller must disclose to a buyer that a home floods during king tides." 

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The Weather Channel, October 2016

"The king tide is causing a lot of problems for communities along the Atlantic Seaboard and Gulf Coasts this week, and experts warn that it will only get worse in the years to come as sea levels rise."

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Village Voice, October 2016

"For the first time ever, the federal government will have to account for forward-looking climate science like sea level rise when it makes maps assessing flood risks for New York City residents."

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Miami Herald, October 2016

"On Twitter and Instagram, picture after picture showed drivers fording roads and water lapping at sidewalks in a state where more people, and more property, are expected to be at risk from sea rise than any other in the nation. By the end of the century, climate scientists say the seas could rise another three to four feet."

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CBS Miami, October 2016

"Deutch says the time for talking is over. Action is what’s needed as the ocean continues to rise. 'For the first time we’ve got Democrats and Republicans sitting together to talk about climate change,' he said. 'Shouldn’t be such a big deal but it is.'”

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Business Insider, October 2016

"Matter published an investigative piece on the state of Louisiana. What's so interesting about it? Well, its coastline is sinking faster than all the other contiguous 47 states, combined, which means what Louisiana actually looks like is completely false to what your grade school map depicts."

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CBS Miami, October 2016

"Area residents say they dread the seasonal tides. 'It’s salt water, it’s so corrosive, it’s damaging to the plants and the environment. It’s frustrating. It interrupts your schedule if you have one and you get all gross twice a day.'”

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Broward Palm Beach New Times, October 2016

"Every October, the king tide sweeps across South Florida as the full moon orbits closest to Earth. This alignment causes the highest water level of the year. Roads and yards flood. But scientists say this could be one of the worst Fort Lauderdale has faced — a perfect storm of an offshore hurricane, the moon's gravitational pull, and sea-level rise."

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Sun Sentinel, October 2016

"An annual high tide surged about a foot above predictions Friday morning, splashing over sea walls, flooding streets and communities across South Florida. The worst is yet to come with tidal flooding peaking Sunday, according to the National Weather Service."

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, October 2016

"Despite reports of serious damage in some areas, for the United States, in any case, the hurricane seemed destined to be remembered mostly as an enormous inconvenience rather than a catastrophe. Authorities repeatedly urged residents who were advised to evacuate not to rush back to their homes."

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Washington Post, October 2016

"Matthew knocked out power to more than 1.3 million people and has been blamed for more than a dozen deaths, including at least seven in North Carolina, four in Florida and three in Georgia. In South Carolina, one person died attempting to drive through floodwaters on Saturday, according to the state’s governor, Nikki Haley."

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National Geographic, October 2016

“When all these cities were developed, sea level was very stable. Our whole way of life is set up around the concept of having a stable coastline. We are entering a new normal. We need to redefine our relationship with the coastline and that means rethinking a lot of different things.”

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WLRN, October 2016

"After near misses with storms like Hurricane Matthew, you often hear about the possibility of 'preparation fatigue.' You do all this work and if the storm doesn’t hit are you less likely to prepare for the next storm?"

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Los Angeles Times, October 2016

“Every coastal flood in the world today is deeper and more damaging because of sea level rise from climate change— period,” said Benjamin Strauss, a scientist who studies sea level rise with Climate Central, an independent research organization. “Even inches make a bigger difference than you would think.”

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CBS News, October 2016

"There are many ways in which Hurricane Matthew, now barreling toward the Florida, Georgia and South and North Carolina coasts, can ruin people’s lives. Flooding is one of the biggest, especially since most homeowners don’t carry this type of coverage. And, for those without it, this could prove to be disastrous."

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The Guardian, October 2016

"There was previously far more certainty among climate scientists over the increase of temperatures than trends in hurricanes, but government officials are now confident enough to say there has been a 'substantial increase' in Atlantic hurricane activity since the 1980s, with the destruction set to ratchet up further as the world warms."

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Claims Journal, September 2016

"According to the National Climate Assessment, a report released by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, climate change increases the probability of heat waves, drought, heavy downpours, floods, hurricanes and creates more extreme winter storms."

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Union of Concerned Scientists, September 2016

"California Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 2800 into law, requiring the creation of a climate-safe infrastructure working group. This law will help address a dangerous disconnect between engineering and climate science that threatens the safety and benefits of costly public infrastructure projects."

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Consultancy UK, September 2016

"[San Francisco] recently launched a number of frameworks for planning services to develop climate resilience within the city. The frameworks will see Ramboll deliver Strategic Planning, Resiliency Planning and Sustainability Planning, working to bolster the city from more intense rain events and higher tides from rising sea levels, as well as improving the city’s ageing sewage systems."

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International Business Times, September 2016

"Pinecrest Mayor Cindy Lerner has made a point of pushing for greater environmental protections to mitigate climate change. This week, she traveled to Washington, D.C., ahead of oral arguments Tuesday in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which would require cuts to carbon emissions from power plants  — a main contributor to climate change — in the country."

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NPR, September 2016

"Reefs slow down incoming swells and waves. The problem is that warmer ocean temperatures are killing a lot of coral, so coral beds shrink down, away from the sea surface. In effect, the water depth increases. 'So there's less drag,' Kuffner says. 'More wave energy can propagate over the reef, so they're not performing as well as breakwaters.'"

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Climate Central, September 2016

“'As you have sea level rise, you get saltwater intrusion further upstream,' Walker said. The 'visual impact' of the dead trees could be useful for 'communicating sea level rise to the public,' she said — 'which I find difficult a lot of the time.'”

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The Guardian, September 2016

"The seas are rising, the oceans are warming, the lower atmosphere is warming, the land is warming, ice is melting, rainfall patterns are changing and the ocean is becoming more acidic. These facts are incontrovertible. No reputable scientist disputes them. It is the truth."

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Washington Post, September 2016

"Under the directive, 20 federal agencies and offices that work on climate science, intelligence and national security must 'collaborate to ensure the best information on climate impacts is available to strengthen our national security' through the new Federal Climate and National Security Working Group. That group must release a climate change and national security action plan in 90 days. All the relevant agencies must then identify steps to implement it."

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Grist, September 2016

"The article, written by Andrew Rice, suggests that waterfront areas where new high-rise offices, apartment buildings, and parks are being developed — such as the far west side of Midtown Manhattan, Brooklyn’s Williamsburg, and Queens’ Long Island City — will be inundated and uninhabitable circa 2100."

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Huffington Post, September 2016

"How do you protect your citizens from cloudbursts, sea rise and other consequences of climate change without undermining other necessary investments? How do you secure that money spent on future incidents that nobody knows when will occur, does not take too much out of today’s budget to citizen’s health and other indispensable items? What is the sustainable break-even here - for todays and future generations?"

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Reuters, September 2016

"'There are few easy answers, but one thing is clear: the current trajectory of climatic change presents a strategically-significant risk to U.S. national security, and inaction is not a viable option,' said a statement published on Wednesday by the Center for Climate and Security, a Washington-based think tank."

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NPR, September 2016

"The floods that hit Louisiana last month were caused by rainfall that was unlike anything seen there in centuries. Most of the southern part of the state was drenched with up to two or three inches in an hour. A total of 31 inches fell just northeast of Baton Rouge in about three days; 20 parishes were declared federal disaster areas. Climate scientists and flood managers suspect there could more like that to come — in Louisiana and in other parts of the country."

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Triple Pundit, September 2016

"Over the past couple of years, more studies were released suggesting that the Antarctic ice is melting faster than scientists had previously thought. Meanwhile, much of the eastern seaboard is slowly sinking, due to natural subsidence. New Yorkers (at least the wealthy ones) have a predilection for living along the waterfront in Manhattan, Brooklyn and even Queens. And the result is that massive investments and planning are needed if the Big Apple is to avoid becoming a Big Atlantis."

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New York Times, September 2016

"A clever new working paper by Jisung Park, a Ph.D. student in economics at Harvard, compared the performances of New York City students on 4.6 million exams with the day’s temperature. He found that students taking a New York State Regents exam on a 90-degree day have a 12 percent greater chance of failing than when the temperature is 72 degrees."

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Business Insider, September 2016

"Even if countries around the world stick to the Paris Agreement, which aims to keep emissions low enough to prevent Earth's temperature from rising more than 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the ocean will rise significantly. And with higher sea levels comes more flooding."

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Miami Herald, September 2016

"Last year, water came over the top of an inadequate seawall and spilled onto the roadway. Together with water bubbling up through the porous ground and storm drains into the street, a high king tide forced the city to shut down the road until the water subsided."

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New York Times, September 2016

"Bombs may not be falling. The sound of gunfire does not concentrate the mind. What Mr. Obama has seen instead are the charts and graphs of a warming planet. 'And they’re terrifying,' he said in a recent interview in Honolulu. 'What makes climate change difficult is that it is not an instantaneous catastrophic event,' he said. 'It’s a slow-moving issue that, on a day-to-day basis, people don’t experience and don’t see.'"

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New York Times, September 2016

"This is, in other words, the height of the season, that time of year when conditions are the most favorable for making cyclones — and for making coastal residents nervous. It is also the moment that puts on display much of what we know, and still do not know, about hurricanes, and what to expect as climate change progresses."

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NPR, August 2016

"Tropical Storm Colin ripped across the Gulf of Mexico in June and hit the coast of southwest Florida with 60-mile-an-hour winds. Before it arrived, a team from the U.S. Geological Survey used a new computer model to predict how far inland the waves would invade."

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The Real Deal, August 2016

"Miami stands to lose up to $3.5 trillion in assets by 2070 due to sea level rise, according to a new National Wildlife Federation report. Miami has the largest amount of exposed assets, beaches included, of any coastal city, the report shows."

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Washington Post, August 2016

"More than 10,000 people were in shelters, miles of roads remained impassable, the start of the school year was canceled and first responders began the grim work of door-to-door inspections to check for drowning victims. Frantic relatives inundated social media, asking for help for those still stuck and those they couldn’t find."

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New York Times, August 2016

"Fourteen of the 15 hottest years have occurred since 2000, as heat waves have become more frequent, more intense and longer lasting. A study in the journal Nature Climate Change last year found that three of every four daily heat extremes can be tied to global warming."

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SF Gate, August 2016

"Adapting to climate change in Southeast Florida, however, is complex. The underlying geology – much of the state lies above porous limestone – and generally flat topography means strategies used elsewhere to combat the effects of sea level rise will not work and that new ideas are needed. Also, Florida is home to a politically conservative state government that reportedly discourages the use of terms like 'climate change,' 'global warming' or 'sustainability' in funding, policy, programs or research."

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Climate Wire, August 2016

"Over the past year alone, catastrophic rain events characterized as once-in-500-year or even once-in-1,000-year events have flooded West Virginia, Texas, Oklahoma, South Carolina and now Louisiana, sweeping in billions of dollars of property damage and deaths along with the high waters."

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South Carolina Public Radio, August 2016

"One way to measure the impact to the city is through nuisance flooding or so called sunny day flooding, That’s when water from high tides or backed up drains inundates streets. In the last 60 years those events have increased 400 percent. And the flooding is worse for the lowest parts of the city which weren’t always dry land."

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Washington Post, August 2016

"Several proposals are on the table, and each includes strategies for pumping out rain and floodwater and for slowing their release into the city’s aging sewer system. The leading contenders would protect about 85 percent of the city from a Sandy-like storm surge, with some waterfront buildings left outside of the barriers."

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New York Times, August 2016

"Everywhere the same refrain — that it has never happened like this — has given rise to the same question: How should communities and families plan for deluges that are theoretically uncommon but now seem to play out with appalling regularity?"

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Mental Floss, August 2016

"A new paper in Scientific Reports analyzes sea levels measured by satellite and new climate models, arguing that the 1991 volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines—the second-largest eruption of the 20th century—cooled the globe and affected rainfall that would have otherwise contributed to sea level rise. In turn, this anomalous eruption obscured how much sea levels were really rising over the decades, since satellites first started observing sea level changes in 1993."

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Regional Plan Association, August 2016

"Billions of dollars have been spent on recovery since Hurricane Sandy in communities like Sea Bright and Mastic Beach, but not enough has gone toward planning for long-term resiliency. This is understandable, given funding guidelines that don’t allow for resiliency upgrades and the urgent need for communities and individuals to get back on their feet as quickly as possible."

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New York Times, August 2016

"The flooding in Louisiana is the eighth event since May of last year in which the amount of rainfall in an area in a specified window of time matches or exceeds the NOAA predictions for an amount of precipitation that will occur once every five hundred years, or has a 0.2 percent chance of occurring in any given year. Louisiana joins five other states, most of them in the South, that have experienced deadly flooding in the last 15 months, including Oklahoma, Texas, South Carolina and West Virginia."

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The New Tropic, August 2016

"Miami is the city with the most money to lose from sea level rise. A 2011 report in the journal “Climate Change” named it  #1 in terms of assets exposed to damage from rising waters. Most experts worry that the end of the Magic City will come at the hands of a major hurricane that will create a massive storm surge, overwhelming our coastal defenses like dunes and seawalls and sending salt water rushing through our streets."

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Huffington Post, August 2016

"While climate change is a pressing global concern, it isn’t at the top of discussions about the future of the real estate market. But a recent report shows how it could have devastating implications for housing in the U.S."

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Washington Post, August 2016

"Predictions suggest that seas should not only rise, but that the rise should accelerate, meaning that the annual rate of rise should itself increase over time. That’s because the great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, should lose more and more mass, and the heat in the ocean should also increase."

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Union of Concerned Scientists, August 2016

"Not just historic buildings or artifacts, but cultural heritage is increasingly at risk. Iñupiaq residents of North Slope Borough, Alaska are resorting to solar-powered ice cellars to preserve traditional food traditions and stave off food insecurity."

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Washington Post, August 2016

"NEPA is pretty sweeping – under it, 'all federal agencies are to prepare detailed statements assessing the environmental impact of and alternatives to major federal actions significantly affecting the environment,' according to the EPA. And now, the new guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality will ask agencies to not only include climate change in these considerations but actually quantify the climate impacts of their decisions."

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Bloomberg, August 2016

"When talking about housing, 'underwater' usually means you owe more on a mortgage than the home is actually worth. If climate change continues apace, that term could take on a much more literal meaning. Rising sea levels could soak homeowners for $882 billion, according to a new report from real estate website Zillow. "

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Jacobin Magazine, August 2016

"Over and over, we’re reminded that we’re are all in it together, that global warming is a tragedy of the commons, that carbon released in China goes into the same atmosphere as carbon released in Belize. But when its eventual effects come to batter our door they will arrive at an exact address: floods and heat waves are intensely local disasters, and their history tells us that we are very much not in it together."

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New York Times, August 2016

"During the 2012 race for president, the issue of climate change was nearly invisible. But this year, the issue is taking on a prominence it has never before had in a presidential general election. The divide between the two parties over the issue is the widest it has been in the decades since it emerged as a public policy matter. That is all the more remarkable given that during the 2008 election, the Democratic and Republican positions on climate change were almost identical."

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Naples Daily News, July 2016

"We’ve been duly warned. Last year the Southwest Florida Sea Level Rise Summit told us ocean rise is inevitable; there’s nothing we can do to stop it. Greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere will continue the warming trend that’s melting ice masses in Greenland and Antarctica at an alarming rate, dumping billions of gallons of additional water into the ocean. That was a year ago, and things haven’t improved."

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Think Progress, July 2016

"For decades, ever since scientists began estimating the threat of floods, the stale-sounding concept of 'stationarity' has been a big factor in their deliberations. Assuming a non-changing climate, experts relied on historical flood risk data to gauge the danger of future floods. But stationarity — as once defined — no longer exists."

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The Atlantic, July 2016

"Climate change is bringing rising sea levels, stronger storms, higher temperatures, prolonged drought and fire seasons, and new disease risks. Broadly speaking, the planet’s poorest citizens will suffer the most. To prepare for a warmer future, local leaders are beginning to develop climate resiliency and adaptation plans. But, as they did in New Orleans, these plans can make vulnerable communities even worse off."

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The Guardian, July 2016

"But while I spend most of my time writing about economics, climate data is what hits me right in the gut. Because if the world keeps warming like it is, talking about GDP, and capital expenditure and interest rates, and our current housing affordability situation will all be rather quaint."

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Huffington Post, July 2016

"The school board voted unanimously to 'abandon the use of any adopted text material that is found to express doubt about the severity of the climate crisis or its root in human activities,' and called for all schools to teach a 'climate justice' curriculum."

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New York Times, July 2016

"The vast algal bloom in the Pacific last year was also fed in part by El Niño, the mass of warm water that forms periodically off the West Coast. But longer-term climate change may also be playing a role, some experts say. Warming atmospheric temperatures and wetter weather in some parts of the country increase the nutrient-laden runoff into streams, lakes and the ocean. And as ice melts in the Arctic, sea temperatures are rising and more sunlight is filtering into the ocean."

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Herald Tribune, July 2016

"More than 340,000 homes in Southwest Florida are at risk of hurricane storm surge, with a potential rebuilding cost topping $65 billion. Florida, surrounded by water, remains the state with the most homes at risk of a storm surge and with the highest reconstruction cost in the U.S."

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New Scientist, July 2016

"But there are also opportunities, including a potential boost to UK agriculture and forestry from warmer weather and a longer growing season, if water shortages and soil quality can be managed. And British businesses may be able to take advantage of an increase in global demand in goods and services which help people adapt to climate change, such as engineering and insurance."

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PRI, July 2016

"It’s a complex problem. Climate change is pushing sea levels up around the world, but the waters of the Atlantic along this part of eastern North America are rising faster than the global average due to changes in the Gulf Stream. Meanwhile, the land in the southern Chesapeake Bay has been slowly sinking for thousands of years."

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BBC, July 2016

"The Climate Change Committee says flooding will destroy bridges - wrecking electricity, gas and IT connections carried on them. The committee also warns that poor farming means the most fertile soils will be badly degraded by mid-century. And heat-related deaths among the elderly will triple to 7,000 a year by the 2050s as summer temperatures rise."

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The Guardian, July 2016

"Sea level rise, which is set to inundate coastal areas currently occupied by millions of Americans, is second on the list of the most urgent issues. The online poll, part of the Guardian’s Voices of America project, further highlights frustration among many voters over the tepid level of debate over climate change in the presidential race so far."

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Rolling Stone, July 2016

"The problem for New York is, climate science is getting better and better, and storm intensity and sea-level-rise projections are getting more and more alarming. It fundamentally calls into question New York's existence. The water is coming, and the long-term implications are gigantic."

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New York Times, July 2016

"Pacific island nations are among the world’s most physically and economically vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events like floods, earthquakes and tropical cyclones. While world powers have summit meetings to negotiate treaties on how to reduce and mitigate carbon emissions, residents of tiny Kiribati, a former British colony with 110,000 people, are debating how to respond before it is too late."

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Fort Lauderdale Magazine, July 2016

"Yet we may look back on this flood-prone era as the good old days. As sea level rises, periodic flooding in low-lying areas of Fort Lauderdale could give way to permanent inundation. 'What we’re seeing with these tidal flooding events now could be a permanent condition going forward,' says Nancy J. Gassman, assistant public works director of the City of Fort Lauderdale."

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Leader's Edge Magazine, June 2016

"Following on the heels of April 1 rate increases and other program changes, Congress is considering legislation to ensure the flood insurance market is open to surplus lines insurers. Together, these modifications create opportunities for brokers to guide their clients toward more stable ground. Keith Brown, CEO of National Flood Services, says the April 1 rate increase notices will likely generate calls to agents and brokers and some movement from the NFIP into the private market."

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Sun Sentinel, June 2016

"Some property insurance companies are not taking on new business in ZIP codes with high claims rates in South Florida and canceling or deciding not to renew customers in high-risk areas. The action is a result of rising water damage claims in the region, the same problem that is leading to higher premiums for many customers."

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Forbes, June 2016

"Make no mistake: implementing far-reaching infrastructure solutions is costly. Local governments cannot bear the burden without generating new dollars. That’s where the real estate development industry comes into the picture."

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KOSU Radio, June 2016

"About two-thirds of the Netherlands sits at or below sea level, and dam-builders and water engineers there have been keeping the ocean at bay for centuries. Their expertise is increasingly in demand as coastal cities begin to plan for rising seas."

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Fast Company, June 2016

"By the end of the century, some of San Francisco's million-dollar apartments and multimillion dollar houses will be underwater. A recent report calculated that property worth a total of $77 billion is at risk from rising seas in the city."

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Time Warner Cable News, June 2016

"The Climate Central study found that at least two-thirds of coastal flood days can be attributed to human induced sea level rise. In Wilmington, 77-percent of coastal flood days were attributed to sea level rise."

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Canada Newswire, June 2016

"The six engineers being certified today have each completed a series of professional development workshops that enhances their competency in planning, designing and managing resilient infrastructure in the face of a changing climate and extreme weather—as well as practical application of their knowledge."

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Think Progress, June 2016

"The Bay Area has long been a bastion of environmental action, but this week locals outdid themselves when they approved an unprecedented, first-of-its-kind tax to remove pollution from their bay and create habitats to fight sea level rise."

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The Weather Channel, June 2016

"We are now transitioning from El Niño to La Niña, which typically packs less of a punch along the coastline. Nuisance flooding can still be expected, but in most locations, it is forecast to be less common than in 2015. Locations that are forecast to have more flooding in 2016 than in 2015 include Boston, Kings Point, New York, Sandy Hook and Atlantic City, New Jersey, Philadephia and Lewes, Deleware.

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Fast Company, June 2016

"Tuesday’s ballot will include the Bay's first regional tax —a $12 annual fee paid by every parcel property owner in these counties—and it would all go towards buffeting the area’s shoreline against coastal flooding, while restoring marshlands that clean pollutants from the Bay’s waters and provide habitat for fish and wildlife."

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Miami Herald, June 2016

"65 percent of survey respondents reported being concerned about the potential impact of climate change and rising sea levels on the real-estate market. According to the survey, buyers did not share the sentiment; only 22 percent mentioned it as an issue."

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Warwick Group Consultants, June 2016

"Finding a solution to the problem of climate refugees and increased displacement is thus dependent on long-term solutions, reducing carbon emissions and combatting global warming, as well as short-term solutions, such as relocation, where displacement is already inevitable."

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Miami Herald, May 2016

"Storms in recent weeks have left the state too waterlogged and water levels in Lake Okeechobee too high as the rainy season ramps up, water managers warned Thursday."

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Miami Herald, May 2016

"Using tracing paper, colorful sticky notes and intimate knowledge of their own neighborhoods, Miami-Dade high school students on Wednesday brainstormed ways to transform suburban landscapes, take care of the aging population and keep their communities resilient in a climate-challenged future."

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Miami Herald, May 2016

"Robo recognized a representative for Coral Gables activist and NextEra shareholder, Alan Farago and his wife Lisa Versaci, to present their shareholder proposal to require the company to report each year on the risk its faces from sea-level rise...NextEra opposed the nonbinding measure, arguing that a proposal that asks the company to speculate on a single aspect of global climate change nearly a century into the future would be a waste of time and money.'”

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NOAA, May 2016

"On average for the nation, nuisance tidal flooding during 2015 generally exceeded historical averages. In many locations, the 2015 increase even exceeded the increasing rate suggested by trends in recent decades."

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Flood List, May 2016

"Lloyd’s says the US government’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which subsidises insurance cover for householders in regions vulnerable to floods and storms, encourages irresponsible house building. Lloyd’s also says the NFIP subsidy regime is financially unsustainable. Because of claims related to disasters such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and superstorm Sandy in 2012, the NFIP has now run up debts of more than $24 billion."

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Miami Herald, May 2016

"The project, called 100 Resilient Cities, provides [the city] money to pay for a chief resilience officer with access to the organization's technology and bank of experts."

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Miami Herald, May 2016

"But since 2005, no single major storm has struck the U.S., a lucky streak, and the longest on record, that forecasters worry has fueled complacency. Their biggest fear is that a powerful hurricane strikes a dense urban area, like Miami, and encounters a population not unlike the residents of 1926, who were ill prepared for a storm and its aftermath."

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Sun Sentinel, May 2016

"The city's initial proposal to protect against rising sea levels would have required all sea walls in the city to be raised by 2035. That proposal, released in April, drew concern from waterfront communities that haven't been experiencing flooding."

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New York Times, May 2016

“It is a very tough challenge, but if we recognize the scale of the problem — and I don’t think most people realize how big it is or how fast the changes are coming — then I think there is a lot we can do.”

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Providence Journal, May 2016

"If the rate of sea-level rise continues to accelerate as expected, Rhode Island would see an increase of a foot of water by 2035 and two feet by 2050, according to federal projections adopted by the state Coastal Resources Management Council."

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PR Newswire, May 2016

"Flex-Wall™ is a low cost approach that utilizes a high strength flexible wall, which can be deployed rapidly for flood protection of buildings and equipment. It is constructed from high tensile strength Kevlar® with stainless steel hardware and can hold back up to 14-feet of rushing floodwater."

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Charlotte Observer, May 2016

“'For too long in Washington, we’ve been unable to have a bipartisan discussion around climate change, but in South Florida, where the rate of sea-level rise outpaces the global rate tenfold, and where the high water mark jumps one inch each year, our local governments and our business leaders recognize we must act for the benefit of our environment and for the benefit of our economy.'”

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NPR, May 2016

"Miami Beach is one of the nation's cities most vulnerable to climate change — and its leaders are doing something about it. The city, a national leader in addressing climate, has begun to make improvements aimed at protecting residents from rising sea levels."

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Broward Palm Beach New Times, May 2016

"The state spent $8.3 million to temporarily keep A1A from disintegrating further, and city officials allocated $11.8 million to rebuild the promenade. This time, though, A1A was built sturdier and higher than before."

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EU, May 2016

"How can we adapt to the earth’s changing climate? This is the main question on the agenda at the Adaptation Futures 2016 conference being held from 10 to 13 May as a follow-up to the Paris climate agreement. 1700 delegates from over a hundred countries will meet in Rotterdam to discuss successful and less successful examples of climate adaptation."

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Realtor Mag, April 2016

"The impact of climate change on the housing market needs to be more carefully considered, according to Freddie Mac in its monthly Insight for April, which focused on flood challenges the industry could face."

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Sun Sentinel, April 2016

"Every sea wall in the city will have to be raised at least eight inches under a proposed plan to protect waterfront communities from rising seas." 

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Miami Herald, April 2016

"A new study has found flooding in some parts of Miami-Dade County could experience eight times as much flooding by 2045 as the Corps launches an ambitious plan to assess coastal risks from Florida to North Carolina and Mississippi."

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The Guardian, April 2016 

"Miami Beach is one of the world’s most vulnerable cities to sea floods, but much of Florida’s coastline is facing similar problems."

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83 Degrees, April 2016 

"The question of how to rethink and retrofit cities for climate change -- and sea level rise in particular -- is an increasingly critical one for public and private sector leaders alike. Asking it can open the door to a wide range of conversations and topics about Tampa Bay area cities, from the highest levels of regional planning, where decisions are made about how and where an entire metropolitan area will grow for decades, all the way down to the scale of individual buildings and their sustainability and resilience in a time of changing climate."

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New York Times, April 2016 

"As climate change threatens, NASA has options that include hardening facilities against the rising seas with barriers and structures adapted to storms and flooding, or if adaptation is not possible, to strategically retreat. Any such strategies will be expensive — though how expensive at this early stage is anyone’s guess."

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Miami Herald, April 2016

"From 1998 to 2006, tidal gauges in South Florida show sea rise keeping up with global averages of about .04 to .20 inches a year. But in 2006, local sea rise suddenly underwent a rapid acceleration, researchers found, averaging about .20 inches to a half inch per year. While the numbers may seem minuscule, they can cause exponential changes in flooding during high tides or South Florida’s soggy rainy season that Wdowinski said could make a big difference in how planners prepare."

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Business Insider, April 2016 

"A recent study published in Nature Climate Change projects that over 4 million residents of the continental US could be affected if sea levels rise 3 feet by the end of the century."

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E&E Publishing

"The Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce panel last week didn't spend much time addressing the causes of climate change or how the community could mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Instead, they focused almost exclusively on the business opportunities created by sea-level rise."

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Miami New Times, March 2016 

Even as scientists continue reminding us that Miami is one of the most susceptible cities to the potential damages of sea-level rise, developers continue erecting shiny luxury tower after shiny luxury tower in the areas most threatened by rising tides. So EMiami Condos, a website that tracks condo development in the city, put two and two together to figure out which buildings are at the highest risk."

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InsideClimate News, March 2016

"Rising seas pull Fort Lauderdale, Florida's Building Boomtown, toward a bust. The Venice of America is expecting its population to grow by a third, but it already can't handle the impacts of climate change."

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Bank Rate, March 2016

"The federal government's flood insurance program is deep in debt, and the financial burden is flowing to its policyholders. Consumers in coastal areas who feel they're getting soaked by surging premiums are anxiously searching for relief. And some are finding that less expensive private flood insurance options may be available."

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New York Times, March 2016 

"In February, a Princeton-based research organization said the tidal flooding that has already made life miserable for people in coastal cities like Miami and Charleston is already getting worse."

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PRI, March 2016 

"Sea level rise is one of the most obvious and ominous effects of global warming, which makes living in low-lying coastal areas increasingly risky. Yet some of the very places that will be most affected by rising seas are undergoing real estate booms...“The real estate community doesn't really want to talk about this and they're not required to talk about flood risk,” Bagley explains. “When you buy a house and there's lead paint you have to get a disclosure form. There’s nothing like that for sea level rise, climate change and flood risk.”

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Sun Sentinel, March 2016

"Flood insurance rates increased for all policyholders Friday as the National Flood Insurance Program continues to dig itself out of $24 billion in debt incurred in the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Sandy and other recent emergencies."

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Grist, March 2016

"There’s good news and there’s bad news: More Americans are concerned about climate change now than at any time in the past eight years. But that’s because the consequences are getting harder to ignore." 

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Miami Herald, March 2016

"Miami Beach and the Florida Department of Transportation are working out an agreement to split the anticipated $25 million it will take to safeguard the low-lying stretch of Indian Creek Drive that was the center of media attention when last fall’s king tides completely flooded the roadway."

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Property Casualty, February 2016 

"For most agents, writing a Homeowners' policy is as easy as riding a bike...Writing Flood insurance is a different matter, more like riding a bike with a flat tire." 

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New York Times, February 2016

"The worsening of tidal flooding in American coastal communities is largely a consequence of greenhouse gases from human activity, and the problem will grow far worse in coming decades, scientists reported Monday. Those emissions, primarily from the burning of fossil fuels, are causing the ocean to rise at the fastest rate since at least the founding of ancient Rome."

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Coastal flooding may force thousands of homes in Louisiana to be elevated or bought out

Events

CRC Shares Insights on Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding at Leading Conferences

  • Adaptation Canada, April 2016
  • Environmental Seminar and Earth Day UpdateUniversity of Pennsylvania, May 2016
  • PROVIA Adaptation Futures, Netherlands, May 2016 
  • Sea Level Rise & South FL Real Estate, Fort Lauderdale, FL May 2016  
  • Wharton Business Radio Show, Preparing for Rising Sea Levels, May 2016

Client Testimonials

See What Clients Say About the Value of CRC’s Products

"My property of 55-acres in Boca was in a flood zone. But, with Coastal Risk's Rapid Assessment, I was able to show my buyers that the future flood risk potential for the property was low. I will certainly recommend and use CRC in all future real estate transactions. It has changed my way of analyzing value."

Rae Kotler
President
Boca Raton Executive Golf Club Corp.

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